Topic: River restoration - International Riversymposium | New Delhi, 12 - 14 September 2016
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Topic: River restoration

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Multi-stakeholder approach to tributary river restoration
Rajesh Ramamoorthy
India

Application of Ecohydraulic Approach in Bank Protection Model
Daru Rini, Endang Arisoesilaningsih, Donny Harisuseno and Soemarno Soemarno
ECOTON, Indonesia

Building sustainable partnetships in river basin management
Bart Fokkens
European Centre for River Restoration, Netherlands

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Multi-stakeholder approach to tributary river restoration

Rajesh Ramamoorthy
India

Multi-stakeholders approaches to river rejuvenation have seen a growing trend globally. Establishing a multi-stakeholder platform at a local level requires at a minimum; an understanding of the past history and existing power structures. For organizations working outside the basin who intend to facilitate this process, it takes longer to understand local dynamics. Multi-stakeholder platforms are built upon certain level of trust among participants. The first degree of trust would involve bringing the parties to a common platform where they see a benefit of being associated. The second degree is where there is intent to work towards a common objective but the approaches and methods employed may be different and the parties may not necessarily agree with each other. Parties that have never worked with others in the past may hesitate to engage/collaborate to work on initiatives/projects even if there is strong motivation to do so. An example would be industry and community which have been at loggerheads for many years continue to not trust one another even if one party shows intent. Some of these challenges may be unique to a particular location. While basin wide approaches have become the defacto unit for river management, this may span across divisions or more commonly districts in India. District administration can serve as decision making bodies but in most cases act as implementing agencies. There is a relatively high churn associated with district administration which makes it challenging for river rejuvenation which require long term commitment. Therefore, an engagement at the state level becomes necessary to ensure continuum. In a nutshell, effective multi-stakeholder platform requires substantial time and dedicated effort on behalf of the facilitating organization. The 2030 Water Resources group is piloting a tributary approach to river restoration for the Hindon in the state of Uttar Pradesh

About the author

Rajesh Ramamoorthy’s research interests lie in sustainable development with an emphasis on water and sanitation. He is currently working on improving access to basic civic services and restoration of water bodies by adopting a multi-stakeholder approach. Rajesh was previously associated with the 2030 Water Resources Group. He holds a Master’s degree in Water Science & Governance from TERI University.

Application of Ecohydraulic Approach in Bank Protection Model

Daru Rini, Endang Arisoesilaningsih, Donny Harisuseno and Soemarno Soemarno
ECOTON, Indonesia

Preliminary survey was done in August 2014 across 11 km of Fish Sanctuary Area in Surabaya River Indonesia, and found 20 sites of eroded bank. Streambank erosion commonly occurs in unstable alluvial environments that change channel morphology (Lay et al., 2015). Streambank erosion is a major source of sediment and nutrient loading to rivers (Daly et al., 2015; Midgley and Heeren, 2012). Ecohydraulic approach was applied to construct a model of bank protection at two eroded sites in Wringinanom and Klubuk. The model is combination of reprofiled and revegetated bank with rock toe reinforcement, and addition of log spur dykes (Brisbane City Council, 2000; McCullah and Gray, 2005). Various kinds of native plant species were planted to establish multi-strata littoral vegetation structure. The impacts on the bank stability and biotic community were observed from September 2014 to January 2016, to collect data on change of bank morphology, bank steepness, near-bank velocity, also abundance and composition of fish community. The bank stability after application in Wringinanom and Klubuk was improved. Bank reprofiling reduced bank steepness to less than 40 degrees and erosion process shift to sedimentation at application sites. The rock toe enforcement and log spur dykes reduce flow velocity at the bank base and multistrata vegetation also reduce near-bank velocity that reduce bank erosion along the application sites. The tree species which grow well at application sites, and survive after inundation and drought period, are Ficus glomerata, Psidium guajava and Muntingia calabura. The ecohydraulic model created new habitat for native fishes. The juveniles of rare fish found to rest under boulders and log dykes. The fish abundance in Wringinanom to Klubuk reach was increased 24% after a year application. The abundance of native fish Pangasius pangasius in Wringinanom to Klubuk reach was increased significantly after model application.

About the author

Daru Setyo Rini is a researcher at NGO Ecological Observation and Wetlands Conservation in Gresik East Java Indonesia. She is also a lecturer at Environmental Engineering Department, Postgraduate Program at Institute of Technology Adhi Tama Surabaya. She is pursuing Ph.D. Course Environmental Science at Brawijaya University. Rini is a wife and mother of three girls who was born in Medan on 16th October 1976. She hold Bachelor Degree in Biology and Master Degree in Environmental Science. Her research interest is on river restoration, river biomonitoring, natural infrastructure, and environmental pollution control. She is now working with ECOTON members and government partners in developing multi-stakeholder collaboration for participatory and integrated river management through Fishery Sanctuary Area of Surabaya River, the first riverine fish conservation area in Indonesia.

Building sustainable partnetships in river basin management

Bart Fokkens
European Centre for River Restoration, Netherlands

Introduction:

The overall goal of the European River Symposium 2016 was to contribute to increased uptake of partnerships and cooperation amongst sectors that influence water and leading to better outcomes. Therefore examples of partnerships and cooperation between water administrations and the sectors which affect or need water, water utilities, hydropower companies, nature organisations, navigation institutes and other partners were highlighted.

Advancing partnerships in river and water management:

The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is not only about keeping the water clean but also includes ecological restoration. Integrating this in other (EU) policies asks for quite a number of balanced decisions, maximizing the benefits for the society. Everything we have to do with water management has to do with other stakes, asking for partnerships.
The development of partnerships takes time to be able to build trust and continuity and is a matter of learning by doing, consulting and listening and awareness that success takes time! Sufficient capacities, a clear framework and external funding are needed to create possible multiple benefits. It is often difficult to get all relevant players on board e.g. all the different ministries. Agriculture is a key sector, however difficult to involve. A basin wide approach is essential to include all aspects e.g. “upstream & downstream thinking”.

Lessons on strengthening partnerships:

Different stakeholders should identify together priority issues and problems and also how to measure and monitor relevant parameters. Extreme positions across sectors and stakeholders have to be ruled out to understand each other. The task of the sector managers is also to enter the political arena. It is inevitable that elements of the private sector will get more involved in water issues within a wider government context. That context is political, messy and multi-scale. Guidance and examples will be needed on how to shape water stewardship.

About the author

Bart Fokkens is the Chair and co-founder of the European Centre for River Restoration, a Pan – European network of national river restoration centres and other members bound by their common mission to promote and enhance ecological river restoration throughout the greater European region. After finishing a College in land and water management, Bart worked for 40 years with the Ministry for Water Management in The Netherlands in different positions on land, water and wetland management. For eight years, Bart was also president of the Dutch National Union of Provincial Nature Conservation Organisations, with 500 sites covering ca. 100.000 ha, mainly wetlands, managed by 12 member organisations. In 2007, Bart was awarded with the Russian Medal “From Understanding to Unity” for having excelled in promoting ideals contributing to the environmental safety of the planet and health of its inhabitants, preventing international conflicts, strengthening international connections and drawing together diverse national cultures.