Nicole Ramilo

Nicole Ramilo

Nicole completed a Bachelor of Engineering in Environmental Engineering at Griffith University, graduating with honours in 2001. Currently working at BMT she has over 16 years of experience in a wide range of environmental and water engineering projects, working both in local government and the consulting industry. Nicole’€™s key areas of expertise include integrated catchment and Total Water Cycle Management planning and Water Sensitive Urban Design.

Integrated Catchment Management Planning for Moreton Bay Regional Council

Significant future population growth, poor waterway health, impacts from creek and river flooding and storm tide inundation are some of the key issues impacting on the Caboolture River Catchment, a priority catchment for management within Moreton Bay Regional Council, as identified through Council’s Total Water Cycle Management (TWCM) planning.

To address these issues and progress Council’s vision for a ‘Water Sensitive Region’, an integrated, holistic approach to catchment management was applied, to reduce the risk to people and property and enhance the environment in a growth area which is essential for ensuring the future sustainable development of the region.

The approach applied involved community consultation, collaboration with Council and Unitywater (the water and wastewater service provider) and performance and cost benefit analyses of management options to appropriately select the preferred least cost management options for addressing catchment issues.

A range of potential management options were identified, assessed and recommended for implementation including waterway riparian revegetation, increased enforcement/ implementation of erosion and sediment control, water sensitive urban design, recycled water use for agriculture, rural best management practices, stormwater harvesting and floodplain management measures. Cost benefit analyses of management measures were critical in determining the cost effectiveness of proposed treatment measures for improving water quality and identifying the best bang for buck options.

Conceptual designs were also prepared for select priority locations to demonstrate the relationship between various land uses and the waterway corridor, and help provide examples of best practice design to achieve multiple outcomes.

This presentation shares the planning process used to develop an integrated catchment management plan for the Caboolture River catchment, and the cost effectiveness and efficacy of various strategies in achieving catchment goals and Council’s vision for a Water Sensitive Region.

 Caboolture River Catchment Management Planning, an Integrated Catchment Management Approach

Significant future population growth, poor waterway health, impacts from creek and river flooding and storm tide inundation are some of the key issues impacting on the Caboolture River Catchment, a priority catchment for management within Moreton Bay Regional Council, as identified through Council’s Total Water Cycle Management (TWCM) planning. To address these issues and progress Council’s vision for a ‘Water Sensitive Region’, an integrated, holistic approach to catchment management was applied, to reduce the risk to people and property and enhance the environment in a growth area which is essential for ensuring the future sustainable development of the region. The approach applied involved community consultation, collaboration with Council and Unitywater (the water and wastewater service provider) and performance and cost benefit analyses of management options to appropriately select the preferred least cost management options for addressing catchment issues. A range of potential management options identified, assessed and recommended for implementation, included waterway riparian revegetation, increased enforcement/ implementation of erosion and sediment control, water sensitive urban design, recycled water use for agriculture, rural best management practices, stormwater harvesting and floodplain management measures.  Cost benefit analyses of management measures were critical in determining the cost effectiveness of proposed treatment measures for improving water quality and identifying the best bang for buck options. Conceptual designs were also prepared for select priority locations to demonstrate the relationship between various land uses and the waterway corridor, and help provide examples of best practice design to achieve multiple outcomes and create a sense of place, connecting communities to waterways. This paper shares the planning process used to develop an integrated catchment management plan for the Caboolture River catchment, and the cost effectiveness and efficacy of various strategies in achieving catchment goals and Council’s vision for a Water Sensitive Region.

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